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lee hazlewood - requiem for an almost lady - light in the attic - cd

LITA 162CD - 99584 - uscd - €15.99

Genre: Wave / Pop / Rock - Folk

1 I'm Glad I Never...
2 If It's Monday Morning
3 L.A. Lady
4 Won't You Tell Your Dreams
5 I'll Live Yesterdays
6 Little Miss Sunshine (Little Miss Rain)
7 Stoned Lost Child
8 Come On Home to Me
9 Must Have Been Something I Loved
10 I'd Rather Be Your Enemy
11 I Just Learned to Run
12 Little Bird (demo)




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1971’s Requiem for An Almost Lady is a personal statement and one of the heaviest break-up albums of all time. There are no lilting strings, sweeping choirs, or dancing trumpets. The arrangements are stripped down to the raw nerve; Lee’s emotions are the orchestra here. The listener eavesdrops on a sonic journal of heartbreak. After losing his lady, his record label, and his country, Lee etches his woes to wax.

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“He was a storyteller, that’s his music... the storytelling. That’s the thing I fell in love with him for. This final story that we see, the Requiem story, is kind of looking back at a career, I think. Not just a relationship—it’s his story. I think it’s authentic and the most revealing, really, because other things are cloaked, cloaked in romanticism, in a way. When you think of ‘Sand’ and ‘Jose,’ ‘My Autumn’s Done Come’ and ‘Some Velvet Morning’... those are stories, they’re stories you make up... they’re fiction. This is a little closer to home, I think.” -Suzi Jane Hokom.

Light in the Attic Records is proud to continue its Lee Hazlewood Archival Series with LHI Records final release. 1971’s Requiem for An Almost Lady is a personal statement and one of the heaviest break-up albums of all time. There are no lilting strings, sweeping choirs, or dancing trumpets. The arrangements are stripped down to the raw nerve; Lee’s emotions are the orchestra here. The listener eavesdrops on a sonic journal of heartbreak. After losing his lady, his record label, and his country, Lee etches his woes to wax.